2014-2015 Academic Calendar

Bright Future Academy

4433 Sheppard Avenue East, 2nd Floor, Room 202, Toronto, Ontario M1S 1V3

T: 416-820-5527   E: bfacademy@hotmail.com   W:www.bfacademy.net

 

1. About the School

 

1. 1. Bright Future Academy

The idea to create Bright Future Academy (BFA) originated in 2006. Since its establishment thereafter, the academy has taught, tutored, and mentored hundreds of high school students from the Greater Toronto area. Situated in Toronto, Bright Future Academy maintains a safe and nurturing learning environment that strives to develop the whole essence of the student: academic fortitude, social responsibility, and emotional intelligence. Under the inspection process conducted by the Ontario Ministry of Education, Bright Future Academy offers credit courses that count towards obtaining an Ontario Secondary School Diploma - which upon completion - prepares students for both post-secondary and personal success. An extensive array of training courses and educational programs are offered for a diverse population of students:  high school credit courses, after school tutoring, TOEFL, IELTS, ESL, SAT and AP training, individualized learning programs and extra-curricular classes.  In essence, BFA is seeking dedicated students who are committed to academic and personal excellence within all of these various educational programs.

1.2. Mission

The mission of Bright Future Academy is to offer quality courses that engage all types of learners, and give them the tools to achieve academic excellence. 

1.3. Importance of completing high school education

High-school completion is the prerequisite stepping stone to post-secondary education, which is now deemed to be vital in today’s highly competitive workforce. Many studies have shown that well-educated citizens are more positively engaged in society. Successful high school graduates tend to make better choices about factors that affect their quality of life (e.g. diet, smoking, exercise, etc…). On average, high school graduates are offered better job opportunities to earn higher incomes than those without their diploma. Less prominent in the mind of the public, but equally well-known among decision-makers, is the fact that well-educated and skilled people tend to make important contributions to business innovation, productivity, and national economic performance.  As a result, not only does receiving a high school diploma provide many personal advantages, it also creates many social benefits as well.

1.4. The Importance of Staying in School Until Age 18 or Obtaining an OSSD

In Ontario, it is a legal requirement for students to remain in school until the age of 18 - engaged in a program that addresses the needs of the student - or until the student earns an Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD). 

1.5. Teachers

Bright Future Academy (BFA) is very proud of its excellent and dedicated teaching staff. Our teachers are all highly qualified and experienced educators who are trained in a wide variety of fields and degrees. The professional teaching team of Bright Future Academy shares a true passion for teaching; they care deeply about our students and wish to offer them a quality education that will enrich both their academic and personal lives. BFA teachers work collaboratively in a continuous professional manner to provide a personalized learning experience for our students that caters to their individual learning needs and goals, thus helping to ensure each student reaches their full potential. Our teachers also participate as coaches and instructors in our extensive array of specialized programs: TOEFL, IELTS, SAT, IB, and AP tutoring. Our teachers also act as Teacher-Advisors who work closely with small groups of students to look after their personal educational and learning needs, including university and college application counseling upon student request.

1.6. School organization

Bright Future Academy is a semester based private school currently under the inspection process conducted by the Ontario Ministry of Education. We offer part-time fall semester courses (September – January), winter semester courses (February – June), and summer semester courses (July – August). Also, we offer evening, weekend, and individualized courses to cater to students’ needs. In the future, Bright Future Academy will consider offering full-day programs when the need rises

 

1.7. Code of Conduct

Bright Future Academy supports and endorses recognition, acceptance, and sensitivity toward ethnocultural diversity.

1.7.1. All members of the school are to be treated with respect and dignity, especially persons in positions of authority.

1.7.2. All members of the school accept responsibility for protecting their rights and the rights of others.

1.7.3. Members of the school community are expected to use non-violent means to resolve conflict. Physically aggressive behaviour is not a responsible way to interact with others.

1.7.4. Members of the school community have a responsibility to maintain a safe environment where conflict and difference can be addressed in a manner characterized by respect and civility.

1.7.5. Recognition and acceptance of, and sensitivity toward, ethnocultural diversity are expectations of and within the school community.

 

1.8. Attendance Policy: Regular, on-time attendance is vital to student success. Students who do not attend their class on a regular basis will diminish their learning experience. Bright Future Academy encourages regular attendance by its students. When a student misses a significant number of classes, the student’s credit may be in jeopardy. The school will may every attempt to support the student with additional or make-up class work when emergencies or illnesses occur, however, unexplained absence will not be accepted.



 

1.8.1. Absence Protocol:


If a student cannot attend school the parent/guardian should call the school on that day to confirm the absence and send a note with the student on the day of their return. On the day that the student returns to school he/she must have a note from their parent/guardian which should be presented to the homeroom teacher.










Students who are absent have the responsibility to catch up on information and work missed. Chronic absences affect academic performance and a meeting with parents will be requested to resolve the problem.





1.8.2. Lateness:


Late arrival at the beginning of the day or for any class is disruptive and will not be tolerated. A note from the student’s parent/guardian is required if a student is late. Students who are late without a note will be sanctioned.


Chronic lateness will not be tolerated. Sanctions will be applied to resolve the problem. This may include making up for work during time that has been lost, providing extra hours of instruction at additional cost to the student etc..

 

1.8.3. Skipping Class:


Skipping classes is prohibited. Sanctions will be assigned and parents may be notified. Students who skip persistently may be suspended.







2. Diploma and Certificates

 

2.1. Requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD)

In order to award the Ontario Secondary School Diploma (OSSD), students must earn a total of 30 credits. A credit is defined as a 110-hour course in which the expectations laid down by the Ministry of Education in the Province of Ontario have been successfully completed. Fully 18 of the credits are compulsory, earned in courses from a list of subjects that every student must take. Fully 12 of the credits are optional, earned in courses that the student may select from the full range of courses offered by the school. Students must also complete 40 hours of Community Involvement Activities and must meet the provincial literacy requirement.

If students are currently registered in another private school or public school in Ontario and are simply taking a small number of courses from Bright Future Academy, then they will in all cases, complete the provincial literacy requirement and Community Involvement Activities at the school in which they are registered. Only students who are the sole responsibility of Bright Future Academy will complete the Community Involvement Activities and the provincial literacy requirement at Bright Future Academy.

2.1.1. Compulsory Credits (total of 18).

  • 4 credits in English (1 credit per grade)*
  • 3 credits in mathematics (1 credit in Grade 11 or 12)
  • 2 credits in science
  • 1 credit in Canadian history
  • 1 credit in Canadian geography
  • 1 credit in the arts**
  • 1 credit in health and physical education
  • 1 credit in French as a second language***
  • 1/2 credit in civics
  • 1/2 credit in career studies

Plus one credit from each of the following groups:

  • Group 1: one additional credit in English (including the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course), French as a second language, classical languages, international languages, Native languages, Canadian and world studies, Native studies, social sciences and humanities, guidance and career education, cooperative education
  • Group 2: one additional credit in French as a second language, the arts, business studies, health and physical education, cooperative education
  • Group 3: one additional credit in French as a second language, science (Grade 11 or 12), computer studies, technological education, cooperative education

Note: The following conditions apply to selections from the above three groups:

  • A maximum of 2 credits in French as a second language may count as additional compulsory credits, 1 credit from Group 1, and 1 credit from either Group 2 or Group 3.
  • A maximum of 2 credits in cooperative education may count as additional compulsory credits, selected from any of Groups 1, 2, or 3.

*

The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC) may be used to meet either the Grade 11 or the Grade 12 English compulsory credit requirement. The Grade 11 Contemporary Aboriginal Voices course may be used to meet the Grade 11 English compulsory credit requirement. For English language learners the requirement may be met through earning a maximum of 3 credits in English as a second language (ESL) or English literacy development (ELD); the fourth credit must be a Grade 12 compulsory English course.

**

The Grade 9 Expressing Aboriginal Cultures course may be used to meet the compulsory credit requirement in the arts.

***

Students who have taken Native languages in place of French as a second language in elementary school may use a Level 1 or 2 Native language course to meet the compulsory credit requirement for French as a second language.

2.1.2. Optional Credits (total of 12)

In addition to the compulsory credits, students must complete:

  • 12 optional credits. The 12 optional credits may include up to 4 credits earned through approved dual credit courses.
  • 40 hours of community involvement activities
  • the provincial literacy requirement

2.1.3. Substitution Credits

In order to allow flexibility in designing a student's program and to ensure that all students can qualify for the OSSD or the OSSC, substitutions may be made for up to 3 compulsory credit courses using courses from the remaining courses offered by the school that meet the requirements for compulsory credits. Students who qualify under this substitute credit arrangement are those whose educational interests, in the opinion of their parents or guardians, or the Principal of the school, are best served by such substitution. In all cases, however, the sum of compulsory and optional credits will not be less than thirty for students aiming to earn the Ontario Secondary School Diploma.

Each substitution will be noted on the student's Ontario Student Transcript.

Bright Future Academy Procedure:

Bright Future Academy does not grant substitutions for compulsory credits.

2.1.4. Ontario Secondary School Literacy Requirement

2.1.4.1. The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT)

OSSLT is the usual method for assessing the literacy skills of students in Ontario for the purpose of determining whether they meet the provincial secondary school literacy requirement for graduation. The test thus identifies students who have demonstrated the required skills in literacy as well as those who have not demonstrated the required skills and will need to do further work. The test identifies the specific areas in which these latter students need remediation. The test is scheduled by and administered through the Education Quality and Accountability Office (EQAO) once each year, usually in the spring. Students will usually take the OSSLT in the school year following the school year in which they enter Grade 9. Students who do not successfully complete the OSSLT will have opportunities to retake the test in subsequent years, on dates scheduled by the EQAO.

 

2.1.4.2. The Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course

For students who have been eligible to write the OSSLT at least twice and who have been unsuccessful at least once, they are eligible to take the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course (OSSLC). OSSLC course focuses on the strategies that competent readers and writers use to understand texts and to write for various purposes. Students taking the course will be given opportunities to improve their knowledge of these strategies and to practice using them in order to strengthen their literacy skills. Poorly developed literacy skills may affect students’ ability to meet curriculum expectations in other subject areas besides English. To help students meet the literacy demands of their work across the curriculum, the course gives particular attention to strategies for understanding and producing informational texts.

Students must succeed in the Literacy Requirement in order to graduate, and their result is recorded on their Ontario School Transcript.

Bright Future Academy Procedure:

Bright Future Academy will not offer the OSSLT component of the Literacy requirement until such time as there are students who attend full-time and Bright Future Academy holds the OSR. Bright Future Academy will offer the OSSLC (OLC4O) component of the Literacy requirement during the summer only if the student has not succeeded in the OSSLT at his/her home, day school.

 

2.1.4.3. OSSLT Accommodations, Special Provisions, Deferrals, and Exemptions

 

Related accommodations are made for students with special education needs where the accommodation is stated in an Individual Education Plan (IEP) and practiced routinely in the classroom. English language learners may qualify for special provisions. Deferral can be granted to students who did not successfully complete Grade 9 English or students who are registered in English as a Second Language. Students who are granted a deferral will write the test at the next scheduled sitting

Exemptions can be made for students who are intentionally not working towards an OSSD. All the practice must follow policies set out by the Ministry of Education Ontario. The policy documents can be accessed at the website:

http://www.eqao.com/pdf_e/09/Sacg_Xe_0409_web.pdf

2.1.5. English Second Language (ESL) and English For Academic Purpose (EAP)

The linguistic diversity of Ontario's student population continues to increase. Some students in our school, require support in learning English including TOEFL/IELTS and to develop English literacy to enable them to achieve the curriculum expectations in all subjects and at all grade levels.

The programs of study offered by Bright Future Academy must be flexible in order to accommodate the needs of students who require instruction in English as a second language or English literacy development, and teachers of all subjects are responsible for helping students develop their ability to use English.

Appropriate accommodations to teaching, learning, and evaluation strategies will constantly be made to help students gain proficiency in English, since students taking English as a second language at the secondary level have limited time in which to develop this proficiency. Our teachers are acutely aware, that it may take up to seven years for a student to acquire a level of proficiency in reading, writing, and abstract thinking in a second language that is on a par with the level mastered by speakers of a first language.

2.1.6. Community Involvement Activities

All students must complete a minimum of 40 hours of unpaid community involvement activities before graduating from high school. This requirement is additional to the 30 credits needed for a high school diploma. Students who are the sole responsibility of Bright Future Academy will be able to choose their own community involvement activities, within guidelines that will be provided by Bright Future Academy. Students will be responsible for fulfilling this requirement on their own time, and for keeping a record of their activities on a tracking booklet supplied by the school. The student is required to submit the tracking booklet yearly, the completion of the requirement is noted on the OST to be kept in the student's OSR. Students will provide documentation of completion of volunteer hours to the Principal of the school where the student's OSR is held.

In order to promote community values by involving students in their community in a positive and contributive manner, students must complete the 40 hours of community activities outside of scheduled class time. Students are to select community activities appropriate to their age, maturity and ability. The student is not to partake in any activity in which the student's safety will be compromised. Any activity NOT on the approved list must receive written approval of the Principal of Bright Future Academy before beginning the activity.

Community Involvement Activities not approved:

  • Any paid activity (i.e. babysitting);
  • Cooperative education;
  • Any activities or programs organized by the school;
  • Playing on sport teams;
  • Any involving the operation of a motor vehicle or power tools or scaffolding;
  • Any involving in the administration of medications or medical procedures to another person;
  • Any occurring in an unsafe or unsupervised environment;
  • Any displacing a paid worker;
  • Any in a logging or mining environment if the student is under 16 years old;
  • Any in a factory, if the student is under 15 years of age;
  • Any taking place in a workplace other than a factory, if the student is under fourteen years of age and is not accompanied by an adult;
  • Any involving handling of substances classed as "designated substances" under the Occupational Health and Safety Act;
  • Any requiring the knowledge of a tradesperson whose trade is regulated by the provincial government;
  • Any involving banking or the handling of securities, or the handling of jewelry, works of art, antiques, or other valuables;
  • Any consisting of duties normally performed in the home (i.e. daily chores) or personal recreational activities;
  • Any involving activities for a court-ordered program (i.e. community-service program for young offenders, probationary program).

Community Involvement Activities approved:

  • Fundraising for non-profit organizations
  • Coaching or assisting sports at the community level
  • Church activities such as helping teach Sunday school, bazaars, etc.
  • Assisting seniors with chores
  • Involvement in community committees, food banks, fairs, etc.
  • Participation in environment projects such as recycling projects, etc.

Roles and Responsibilities of the Stakeholders

The Principal is required to provide information about the community involvement requirement to parents, students, and community sponsors. The Principal is also required to provide students with the information and forms they will need to complete the community involvement requirement, including the school's list of approved activities from which to choose. After a student completes the 40 hours of community involvement and submits all documentation of their completion to the school, the principal will decide whether the student has met the community involvement requirement and, if so, will record it as completed on the student's official transcript (OST).

In consultation with their parents, students will select an activity or activities from the list of approved activities, or choose an activity that is not on the list, provided that it is not an activity specified on the Ministry of Education's and the school's lists of ineligible activities. If the activity is not on the list of approved activities, the student must obtain written approval from the principal before beginning the activity.

Before beginning any activity, students will provide the principal or other school contact with a completed "Notification of Planned Community Involvement Activities" form indicating the activity or activities that they plan to do. This form must be signed by the student, and by his or her parent if the student is under eighteen years of age. More than one such form may be submitted when additional activities are planned that were not included on a previously submitted form.

A "Completion of Community Involvement Activities" form must be completed by the student, the student's parent (if the student is under eighteen years of age), and the community sponsor (that is, the person or organization that provided the community involvement opportunity for the student). The student must submit the form to the principal or other school contact upon completion of the 40 hours or at appropriate intervals determined by the principal.

Parents (or guardians) should provide assistance to their child in the selection of their community involvement activities. Parents are also encouraged to communicate with the community sponsor and the school principal if they have any questions or concerns. A parent must sign the "Notification of Planned Community Involvement Activities" form and the "Completion of Community Involvement Activities" form if the student is under the age of eighteen years. Parents are also responsible for obtaining the appropriate insurance covering the student for any unseen circumstances while involved in these community activities.

One of the purposes of the community involvement requirement is to develop strong ties between the students and their community, fostering valuable and long-term relationships. Persons and organizations within the community may be asked by the student to sponsor a community involvement activity. Any training, equipment, or special preparation that is required for the activity should be provided by the person or organization. It is crucial that students are able to fulfill their community involvement requirement in a safe environment. The person overseeing the student's activity must verify the date(s) and the number of hours completed on the "Completion of Community Involvement Activities" form. Community sponsors will be responsible for ensuring that their liability insurance will protect them for their involvement in the program. The community sponsor should be aware that the students do not have either accident insurance or Workplace Safety Insurance through the Bright Future Academy. The community sponsors should ensure that the students are provided with adequate safety instructions, are trained properly for their work and supervised to ensure a safe volunteer experience.

Bright Future Academy Procedure:

Bright Future Academy does not currently have students who are enrolled on a full-time basis where Bright Future Academy holds the OSR. Therefore, Bright Future Academy does not provide opportunity to complete any Community Involvement requirements.

2.2. Ontario Secondary School Certificate

2.2.1. The Ontario Secondary School Certificate (OSSC) will be granted, on request, to students who are leaving secondary school upon reaching the age of eighteen without having met the requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma. To be granted an OSSC, a student must have earned a minimum of 14 credits, distributed as follows.

Compulsory Credits (total of 7)

  • 2 credits in English
  • 1 credit in Canadian geography OR Canadian history
  • 1 credit in mathematics
  • 1 credit in science
  • 1 credit in health and physical education
  • 1 credit in the arts, computer studies or technological education

Optional Credits (total of 7)

  • 7 credits selected by the student from available courses

Note: The Principal, to better serve a student's educational interest, and in consultation with the parent, may replace up to three courses with courses meeting the requirement for compulsory credits. Either the Principal or the parent may initiate the process. The total of compulsory and optional credits will still not be less than 14 for granting an OSSC. The substitution will be noted on the OST.

2.3. Certificate of Accomplishment

Students who are leaving secondary school upon reaching the age of eighteen without having met the requirements for the Ontario Secondary School Diploma or the Ontario Secondary School Certificate may be granted a Certificate of Accomplishment. The Certificate of Accomplishment may be a useful means of recognizing achievement for students who plan to take certain kinds of further training, or who plan to find employment directly after leaving school. The Certificate of Accomplishment is to be accompanied by the student's Ontario Student Transcript. For students who have an Individual Education Plan (IEP), a copy of the IEP may be included.

Students who return to school to complete additional credit and non-credit courses (including courses with modified or alternative expectations in special education programs) will have their transcript updated accordingly but will not be issued a new Certificate of Accomplishment. The Ontario Secondary School Diploma or Ontario Secondary School Certificate will be granted when the returning student has fulfilled the appropriate requirements.

 

3. Curriculum

The curriculum at Bright Future Academy focuses on real-life applications of student learning. The curriculum is also based upon the curriculum expectations set by the Ministry of Education, Ontario. In each course outline, web links to the original curriculum document from the Ministry of Education is provided. The curriculum is respectful of diversity in Canadian society. All the curriculums can be accessed by visiting the Ministry’s website: http://www.edu.gov.on.ca/eng/teachers/curriculum.html

 

4. Program Planning

All persons interested in secondary education at the Bright Future Academy will find below a summary and discussion of the relevant policies set out in Ontario Schools: Policy and Program Requirements, 2011 (OS)as set out by the Ministry of Education of Ontario.

Links to all of the appropriate Ontario Curriculum Documents are made available to parents, guardians and students from the Introduction Unit of each course. They are also available to the general public from the Ministry of Education's website at www.edu.gov.on.ca

 

4.1. Definition of a Credit

The Ontario secondary school program is based on a credit system. Full credit courses are 110 hours in length. A credit is granted by the Principal on behalf of the Ministry of Education in recognition of the successful completion of the expectations of a 110-hour course that has been developed or approved by the Ministry of Education.

The curriculum is organized into several types of courses, intended to enable students to choose courses suited to their strengths, interests, and goals.

 

4.2. Types of Secondary School Courses in Ontario Curriculum Grade 9 to G10

 

Type 1: Academic courses develop students' knowledge and skills through the study of theory and abstract problems. These courses focus on the essential concepts of a subject and explore related concepts as well. They incorporate practical applications as appropriate. The code of an academic course ends with the letter "D", ie ENG1D

 

Type 2: Applied courses focus on the essential concepts of a subject and develop students' knowledge and skills through practical applications and concrete examples. Familiar situations are used to illustrate ideas, and students are given more opportunities to experience hands-on applications of the concepts and theories they study. The code of an applied course ends with the letter "P", ie ENG1P

 

Type 3: Open courses, which comprise a set of expectations that are appropriate for all students, are designed to broaden students' knowledge and skills in subjects that reflect their interests and prepare them for active and rewarding participation in society. They are not designed with the specific requirements of university, college, or the workplace in mind. The code of an open course ends with the letter "O", ie BTT2O

 

Students in Grades 9 and 10 will make the choice between academic, applied and open courses primarily on the basis of their strengths, interests, and needs. Their parents or guardians, the Principal and teachers, will help them make their choices. Students who are successful in any academic or applied course in Grade 9 will have the opportunity to enter either the academic or applied course in the same subject in Grade 10. Grade 10 academic courses prepare students for Grade 11 University or College preparation courses; Grade 10 applied courses prepare students for Grade 11 College or Workplace preparation courses.

 

4.3. Types of Secondary School Courses in Ontario Curriculum Grades 11 and 12 Courses  

At Bright Future Academy, Grade 11 and 12 students will choose from among four course types: university preparation, university/college preparation, college preparation, workplace, and open courses. Students will make their choices based on their interest, achievement, and career goals. Prerequisites are specified for many of the courses offered in Grades 11 and 12 according to the curriculum. The following are four types of courses offered by Bright Future Academy in Grades 11 and 12:

  1. College preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for most college programs or for admission to specific apprenticeship or other training programs. The code of a college preparation course ends with the letter "C", ie MBF3C
  2. University preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for university programs. The code of a university preparation course ends with the letter "U", ie SCH3U
  3. University / college preparation courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the entrance requirements for specific programs offered at universities and colleges. The code of an university / college preparation course ends with the letter "M", ie MCF3M
  4. Workplace courses are designed to equip students with the knowledge and skills they need to meet the expectations of employers if they plan to enter the workforce directly after graduation, or the requirements for admission to certain apprenticeship or other training programs. The code of a workplace course ends with the letter “E”, ie ENG3E
  5. Open courses, which comprise a set of expectations that are appropriate for all students, are designed to broaden students' knowledge and skills in subjects that reflect their interests and prepare them for active and rewarding participation in society. They are not designed with the specific requirements of university, college, or the workplace in mind .The code of an open course ends with the letter "O", ie EMS3O

4.4. Course Coding System

The common course code of courses at Bright Future Academy consists both of a five code character and a course title component, as designed by the Ministry of Education in Ontario:

 

For example: MCV4U a, Calculus and Vectors

MCV

4

U

a

Calculus and Vectors

Course Descriptor

Grade of Course

Course Type

School Code

Course Title

Calculus

and

Vectors

"1" = Grade 9
"2" = Grade 10
"3" = Grade 11
"4" = Grade 12






M

Academic
Applied
Open
University
College
University / College

Locally developed

 

Calculus and Vectors







 

4.5. Course Descriptions

 

4.5.1. Course Descriptions (G9)

 

LKAAD: Mandarin

This course is designed to enable students to begin to communicate with native speakers of the language of study. Students will use simple language and read age- and language appropriate passages for various purposes. They will explore aspects of the culture of countries where the language under study is spoken, including social customs and the arts, by participating in cultural events and activities involving both print and technological resources.

 

Prerequisites: none

 

4.5.2. Course Descriptions (G10)

 

LKABD: Mandarin

This course provides students with the language learning experiences that will enable them to communicate in the language of study. Students will continue to develop and apply their speaking skills in a variety of contexts, and will participate in activities that will improve their reading comprehension and writing skills. They will also continue to explore aspects of the culture of countries where the language under study is spoken by taking part in community sponsored events and activities involving both print and technological resources.

Although students will continue to expand their vocabulary and repertoire of language structures, the language they will use at this level will still be simple.

 

Prerequisites: none

 

4.5.3. Course Descriptions (G11)

 

ENG3U: English

This course emphasizes the development of literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyse challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures, as well as a range of informational and graphic texts, and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using language with precision and clarity and incorporating stylistic devices appropriately and effectively. The course is intended to prepare students for the compulsory Grade 12 university or college preparation course

 

Prerequisite: English, Grade 10, Academic

 

MCR3U: Functions

This course introduces the mathematical concept of the function by extending students' experiences with linear and quadratic relations. Students will investigate properties of discrete and continuous functions, including trigonometric and exponential functions; represent functions numerically, algebraically, and graphically; solve problems involving applications of functions; investigate inverse functions; and develop facility in determining equivalent algebraic expressions. Students will reason mathematically and communicate their thinking as they solve multi-step problems

 

Prerequisite: Principles of Mathematics, Grade 10, Academic

 

SCH3U: Chemistry

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of the properties of chemicals and chemical bonds; chemical reactions and quantitative relationships in those reactions; solutions and solubility; and atmospheric chemistry and the behaviour of gases. Students will further develop their analytical skills and investigate the qualitative and quantitative properties of matter, as well as the impact of some common chemical reactions on society and the environment.

 

Prerequisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic

 

SPH3U: Physics

This course develops students' understanding of the basic concepts of physics. Students will explore kinematics, with an emphasis on linear motion; different kinds of forces; energy transformations; the properties of mechanical waves and sound; and electricity and magnetism. They will enhance their scientific investigation skills as they test laws of physics. In addition, they will analyze the interrelationships between physics and technology, and consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

 

Prerequisite: Science, Grade 10, Academic

 

BAF3M: Financial Accounting Fundamentals

This course introduces students to the fundamental principles and procedures of accounting. Students will develop financial analysis and decision-making skills that will assist them in future studies and/or career opportunities in business. Students will acquire an understanding of accounting for a service and a merchandising business, computerized accounting, financial analysis, and ethics and current issues in accounting.

 

Prerequisites: none

 

LKACU: Mandarin

This course offers students opportunities to further develop their knowledge of the international language and to enhance their communication skills. Students will use increasingly sophisticated language in a variety of activities that will enable them to speak and write with clarity and accuracy. Students will also enhance their thinking skills through the critical study of literature, and continue to explore aspects of the culture of countries where the language is spoken through a variety of print and technological resources.

 

Prerequisites: International Languages, Level 2, Academic

 

 

 

4.5.4. Course Descriptions (Grade 12)

 

ENG4U: English

This course emphasizes the consolidation of the literacy, communication, and critical and creative thinking skills necessary for success in academic and daily life. Students will analyze a range of challenging literary texts from various periods, countries, and cultures; interpret and evaluate informational and graphic texts; and create oral, written, and media texts in a variety of forms. An important focus will be on using academic language coherently and confidently, selecting the reading strategies best suited to particular texts and particular purposes for reading, and developing greater control in writing. The course is intended to prepare students for university, college, or the workplace.

 

Prerequisite: English, Grade 11, University Preparation

 

MCV4U: Calculus and Vectors

This course builds on students' previous experience with functions and their developing understanding of rates of change. Students will solve problems involving geometric and algebraic representations of vectors and representations of lines and planes in three dimensional space; broaden their understanding of rates of change to include the derivatives of polynomial, sinusoidal, exponential, rational, and radical functions; and apply these concepts and skills to the modelling of real-world relationships. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended for students who choose to pursue careers in fields such as science, engineering, economics, and some areas of business, including those students who will be required to take a university-level calculus, linear algebra, or physics course

 

Prerequisite: Advanced Functions MHF4U.

Note: MHF4U may be taken concurrently

 

MHF4U: Advanced Functions

This course extends students' experience with functions. Students will investigate the properties of polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; develop techniques for combining functions; broaden their understanding of rates of change; and develop facility in applying these concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. This course is intended both for students taking the Calculus and Vectors course as a prerequisite for a university program and for those wishing to consolidate their understanding of mathematics before proceeding to any one of a variety of university programs

 

Prerequisite: Functions, Grade 11, University Preparation, or Mathematics for College

Technology, Grade 12, College Preparation

 

MDM4U: Mathematics of Data Management

This course broadens students' understanding of mathematics as it relates to managing data. Students will apply methods for organizing and analyzing large amounts of information; solve problems involving probability and statistics; and carry out a culminating investigation that integrates statistical concepts and skills. Students will also refine their use of the mathematical processes necessary for success in senior mathematics. Students planning to enter university programs in business, the social sciences, and the humanities will find this course of particular interest.

 

Prerequisite: Functions, MCR3U OR Functions and Applications, MCF3M

 

BAT4M: Accounting

This course introduces students to advanced accounting principles that will prepare them for postsecondary studies in business. Students will learn about financial statements for various forms of business ownership and how those statements are interpreted in making business decisions. This course expands students’ knowledge of sources of financing, further develops accounting methods for assets, and introduces accounting for partnerships and corporations

 

Prerequisite: Financial Accounting Fundamentals, Grade 11, University/College Preparation

 

BBB4M: International Business Fundamentals

This course provides an overview of the importance of international business and trade in the global economy and explores the factors that influence success in international markets. Students will learn about the techniques and strategies associated with marketing, distribution, and managing international business effectively. This course prepares students for postsecondary programs in business, including international business, marketing, and management.

 

Prerequisite: None

 

CIA4U: Analyzing Current Economic Issues

This course investigates the nature of the competitive global economy and explores how individuals and societies can gain the information they need to make appropriate economic decisions. Students will learn about the principles of microeconomics and macroeconomics, apply economic models and concepts to interpret economic information, assess the validity of statistics, and investigate marketplace dynamics. Students will use economic inquiry and communication skills to analyze current economic issues, make informed judgments and present their findings.

 

Prerequisite: Any 3U or 3M level Canadian and World Studies, English or Social Studies and Humanities course

 

SCH4U: Chemistry

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of chemistry through the study of organic chemistry, energy changes and rates of reaction, chemical systems and equilibrium, electrochemistry, and atomic and molecular structure. Students will further develop problem-solving and laboratory skills as they investigate chemical processes, at the same time refining their ability to communicate scientific information. Emphasis will be placed on the importance of chemistry in daily life, and on evaluating the impact of chemical technology on the environment.

 

Prerequisite: SCH3U

 

SPH4U: Physics

This course enables students to deepen their understanding of physics concepts and theories. Students will continue their exploration of energy transformations and the forces that affect motion, and will investigate electrical, gravitational, and magnetic fields and electromagnetic radiation. Students will also explore the wave nature of light, quantum mechanics, and special relativity. They will further develop their scientific investigation skills, learning, for example, how to analyse, qualitatively and quantitatively, data related to a variety of physics concepts and principles. Students will also consider the impact of technological applications of physics on society and the environment.

 

Prerequisite: SPH3U

 

HFA4M: Food and Nutrition Sciences

This course examines various nutritional, psychological, social, cultural, and global factors that influence people’s food choices and customs. Students will learn about current Canadian and worldwide issues related to food, frameworks for making appropriate dietary choices, and food-preparation techniques. This course also refines students’ skills used in researching and investigating issues related to food and nutrition.

 

Prerequisite: Any university, university/college, or college preparation course in social sciences and humanities, English, or Canadian and world studies

 

 

LKADU: International Languages, Level 4: Mandarin

This course prepares students for university studies in the international language. Students will enhance their ability to use the language with clarity and precision, and will develop the language skills needed to engage in sustained conversations and discussions, understand and evaluate information, read diverse materials for both study and pleasure, and write clearly and effectively. Students will also have opportunities to add to their knowledge of the culture of countries where the language is spoken through the use of community resources and computer technology.

 

Additional Information:

They will study different genres of Chinese literature, classical and modern, through reading, discussions, semi-lectures, and research projects. This course aims to foster your independent thinking and your ability to appreciate and critique a piece of literary work objectively. You will enhance your ability to use the language with clarity and precision and engage in sustained conversations and discussions. You are going to develop writing skills through many short essays and independent projects. There will be field trips to the ROM and Chinatown. You will be exposed to Chinese philosophy, arts and society through films and computer technology, which will make your learning more enjoyable and rewarding. This course will be conducted in Mandarin. All students need to take an interview assessment before registering for this course.

 

Prerequisite: International Languages, Level 3, University Preparation

 

BOH4M: Business Leadership: Management Fundamentals

This course focuses on the development of leadership skills used in managing a successful business. Students will analyze the role of a leader in business, with a focus on decision making, management of group dynamics, workplace stress and conflict, motivation of employees, and planning. Effective business communication skills, ethics, and social responsibility are also emphasized.

 

Prerequisite: None

 

OLC4O: Ontario Secondary School Literacy Course, Grade 12

This course is designed to help students acquire and demonstrate the cross-curricular literacy skills that are evaluated by the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test. Students who complete the course successfully will meet the provincial literacy requirement for graduation. Students will read a variety of informational, narrative, and graphic texts and will produce a variety of forms of writing, including summaries, information paragraphs, opinion pieces, and news reports. Students will also maintain and manage a literacy portfolio containing a record of their reading experiences and samples of their writing.

 

Prerequisite: Students who have been eligible to write the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT) at least twice, and have been unsuccessful at least once, are eligible to take this course to achieve both a Grade 12 credit and their literacy credential for graduation.

 

 

4.5.5. English as a Second Language (ESL)

 

ESLBO: English as a Second Language, ESL Level 2 Open

This course extends students’ listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in English for everyday and academic purposes. Students will participate in conversations in structured situations on a variety of familiar and new topics; read a variety of texts designed or adapted for English language learners; expand their knowledge of English grammatical structures and sentence patterns; and link English sentences to compose paragraphs. The course also supports students’ continuing adaptation to the Ontario school system by expanding their knowledge of diversity in their new province and country

 

Prerequisite: ESLAO or permission of the principal

 

ESLCO: English as a Second Language, ESL Level 3 Open

This course further extends students’ skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing in English for a variety of everyday and academic purposes. Students will make short classroom oral presentations; read a variety of adapted and original texts in English; and write using a variety of text forms. As well, students will expand their academic vocabulary and their study skills to facilitate their transition to the mainstream school program. This course also introduces students to the rights and responsibilities inherent in Canadian citizenship, and to a variety of current Canadian issues.

 

Prerequisite: ESLBO or permission of the principal

 

ESLDO: English as a Second Language, ESL Level 4 Open

This course prepares students to use English with increasing fluency and accuracy in classroom and social situations and to participate in Canadian society as informed citizens. Students will develop the oral-presentation, reading, and writing skills required for success in all school subjects. They will extend listening and speaking skills through participation in discussions and seminars; study and interpret a variety of grade-level texts; write narratives, articles, and summaries in English; and respond critically to a variety of print and media texts.

 

Prerequisite: ESLCO or permission of the principal

 

ESLEO: English as a Second Language, ESL Level 5, Open

This course provides students with the skills and strategies they need to make the transition to college and university preparation courses in English and other secondary school disciplines. Students will be encouraged to develop independence in a range of academic tasks. They will participate in debates and lead classroom workshops; read and interpret literary works and academic texts; write essays, narratives, and reports; and apply a range of learning strategies and research skills effectively. Students will further develop their ability to respond critically to print and media texts.

 

Prerequisite: ESLDO or permission of the principal

 

4.6. Access to Course Outlines

All the course outlines are on file and are available upon request at Bright Future Academy

4.7. Prerequisite Courses

Courses in Grades 10, 11, and 12 may have prerequisites for enrolment. All prerequisite courses are identified in ministry curriculum policy documents, and no courses apart from these may be identified as prerequisites. Schools must provide parents and students with clear and accurate information about prerequisites. If a parent or an adult student (a student who is eighteen years of age or older) requests that a prerequisite be waived, the principal will determine whether or not the prerequisite should be waived. A principal may also initiate consideration of whether a prerequisite should be waived. The principal will make his or her decision in consultation with the parent or the adult student and appropriate school staff.

Bright Future Academy Procedure:

Bright Future Academy will honour the prerequisite requirements as stated in the subject discipline policy documents. Therefore Bright Future Academy will not waive prerequisite courses.

4.8. Changing Course Types

Some students may change their educational goals as they proceed through secondary school. When they decide to switch to a new pathway, they may find that they have not completed all of the prerequisite courses they need. Schools must make provisions to allow students to make such changes of direction and must clearly describe these provisions in their school program/course calendar. In most cases, a student may enroll in a different type of course in a given subject in Grade 10 rather than the type he or she completed in Grade 9, although doing so may require additional preparation, as recommended by the principal. In the case of mathematics, however, the sole prerequisite for the Grade 10 academic mathematics course is the Grade 9 academic mathematics course, so a student who is planning to move from the Grade 9 applied mathematics course to the Grade 10 academic mathematics course must take either the designated transfer course (MPM1H) or the Grade 9 academic mathematics course (MPM1D). In Grades 10 to 12, a student may change to a different type of course in a given subject provided that the student has taken any course specified as a prerequisite for that course. If the student has not done so, he or she may take one of the specified prerequisite courses through Bright Future Academy. If the principal believes that a student can be successful in a particular course without having taken the specified prerequisite course, the principal may waive the prerequisite.

 

Bright Future Academy Procedure:

Bright Future Academy Bright Future Academy will honour the prerequisite requirements as stated in the subject discipline policy documents. Therefore, Bright Future Academy will not waive prerequisite courses. When required, a student may take one of the specified prerequisite courses through Bright Future Academy.

5. Assessment, Evaluation & Reporting of Student Achievement

Each student must have opportunities to achieve success according to his or her own interests, abilities and goals. Bright Future Academy assessment and evaluation policy is based on seven fundamental principles. The first one tells that assessment, evaluation, and reporting practices and procedures must be fair, transparent and equitable for all students. Students and parents need to know that evaluations are based on evidence of student learning performance and that there is consistency in the way grades are assigned.

When these 7 principles are fully understood and observed by all teachers, they will guide the collection of meaningful information that will help inform instructional decisions, promote student engagement and improve student learning:

  1. Fair for all students,
  2. Support all students, including students with and Individual Education Plan (IEP),
  3. Related to curriculum expectations as well as interest of all students,
  4. Clearly communicated to students and parents,
  5. Ongoing, varied in nature,
  6. Provide descriptive feedback that is meaningful and timely to support learning,
  7. Develop student self assessments.

5.1. Assessment and Evaluation Strategies

Bright Future Academy will utilize a variety of assessment and evaluation tools including tests, observations, reports, projects, group work, essays, quizzes, journals, and final examinations. The primary purpose of assessment and evaluation is to make students learn. In every first class of each course, students will be informed of the assessment and evaluation process and pertinent rubrics. Regular communication with parents / guardians is available. Tracking of students’ progress with respect to expectations is the shared responsibility of both students and teachers. Rubrics will be used by teachers regularly and consistently. Following major evaluations and assessments, interviews will be available for parents to communicate with teachers or school principal.

Evaluation of students should be fair and consistent within a given course. The evaluation policies will be submitted by the teachers in the various subject areas to the Principal for review before giving them to the students. In order to ensure that assessment and evaluation are valid and reliable, and that they lead to the improvement of student learning, teachers must use assessment and evaluation strategies that:

·         address both what students learn and how well they learn;

·         are based both on the categories of knowledge and skills and on the achievement level descriptions given in the achievement chart that appears in the curriculum policy document for each discipline,

·         are varied in nature, administered over a period of time, and designed to provide opportunities for students to demonstrate the full range of their learning,

·         are appropriate for the learning activities used, the purposes of instruction, and the needs and experiences of the students,

·         are fair to all students,

·         accommodate the needs of exceptional students, consistent with the strategies outlined in their Individual Education Plan (IEP),

·         accommodate the needs of students who are learning the language of instruction,

·         ensure that each student is given clear directions for improvement,

·         promote students' ability to assess their own learning and to set specific goals,

·         include the use of samples of students' work that provide evidence of their achievement,

·         are communicated clearly to students and parents at the beginning of the course and at other appropriate points throughout the course.

5.2. The Achievement Chart

The achievement chart for each discipline is included in the curriculum policy document for that discipline. The chart provides a reference point for all assessment practice and a framework within which to assess and evaluate student achievement.

·         The chart is organized into four broad categories; Knowledge / Understanding, Thinking / Inquiry, Communication, and Application / Making Connections. The Names of the categories differ slightly from one discipline to another, reflecting differences in the disciplines.

·         The achievement chart describes the levels of achievement of the curriculum expectations within each category. The descriptions associated with each level serve; as a guide for gathering assessment information, to enable teachers to make consistent judgements about the quality of student work, and to provide clear feedback to students.

·         The achievement chart provides Bright Future Academy (Ontario) teachers with a provincial standard to use in assessing and evaluating their students' achievement. A variety of materials are to be made available to assist teachers in improving their assessment methods and strategies and, hence, their assessment of student achievement.

·         The following table provides a summary description of achievement in each percentage grade range and corresponding level of achievement:

 

Achievement Chart

Percentage Grade Range

Achievement Level

Summary Description

80-100%

Level 4

A very high to outstanding level of achievement. Achievement is above the provincial standard.

70-79%

Level 3

A high level of achievement. Achievement is at the provincial standard.

60-69%

Level 2

A moderate level of achievement. Achievement is below, but approaching, the provincial standard.

50-59%

Level 1

A passable level of achievement. Achievement is below the provincial standard.

below 50%

Level R

Insufficient achievement of curriculum expectations. A credit will not be granted.

NOTE: Level 3 (70-79%) is the provincial standard. Teachers and parents can be confident that students who are achieving at level 3 are well prepared for work in the next grade or the next course. An evaluation of achievement of Level 4 does not suggest that the student is achieving expectations beyond those specified for the course, but rather that he or she demonstrates a very high to outstanding level of achievement of the specified expectations, and a greater command of the requisite knowledge and skills than a student achieving Level 3. A student whose achievement is below 50% at the end of the course will not obtain a credit for the course.

5.3. Reporting Student Achievement

Student achievement is communicated formally to students and parents by means of the Bright Future Academy "Secondary School Report Card, Grades 9-12".

5.3.1 Reporting on Achievement of Curriculum Expectations

The report card, which follows the Provincial Report Card extremely closely, provides a record of the student's achievement of the curriculum expectations in the form of a percentage grade, which reflects the corresponding level of achievement as described in the achievement chart for the discipline.

·         A final grade is recorded for every course, and a credit is granted and recorded for every course in which the student's grade is 50% or higher.

·         The final grade for each course in Grades 9-12 will be determined as follows: 70% of the grade will be based on evaluations conducted throughout the course. This portion of the grade should reflect the student's most consistent level of achievement throughout the course, although special consideration should be given to more recent evidence of achievement. 30% of the grade will be based on a final evaluation in the form of an examination and or performance essay and/or other method of evaluation suitable to the course content and administered towards the end of the course.

Evaluation refers to the process of judging the quality of student learning on the basis of established performance standards and to assign a value to represent that quality. Evaluation is based on "assessment of learning".

While all curriculum expectations must be accounted for in instruction and assessment, the evaluation focuses on students' achievement of the overall expectations. A student's achievement of the overall expectation is evaluated on the basis of their achievement of related specific expectations. Teachers will use their professional judgment to determine which specific expectations should be used to evaluate achievement of the overall expectations. Evidence of student achievement for evaluation is collected over time from three difference sources; observations, conversations and student products. Evaluation is the responsibility of the teacher and does not include the judgment of the student's peers.

5.3.2 Reporting on Demonstrated Learning Skills and Work Habits

The report card provides a record of the learning skills demonstrated by the student in every course. The 6 identified learning skills and work habits are: (1) Responsibility, (2) Organization, (3) Independent Work, (4) Collaboration, (5) Initiative, (6) Self-regulation. The learning skills and work habits are evaluated using a four-point scale: (E - Excellent, G - Good, S - Satisfactory, N - Needs Improvement).

 

5.3.3 Teacher Comments

The report card also includes teachers' comments on the student's strengths, weaknesses, and areas in which improvement is needed.

5.3.4. Principal Comments

The report card may also include the principal's comments on the performance of the student.

5.4. Methods of Evaluation

Teachers will take various considerations into account before making a decision about the grade to be entered on the report card. Teachers will consider all evidence collected from all products submitted or NOT submitted. Some evidence may carry more weight than others. Teachers will consider all evidence and use their professional judgments to determine the student's report card grade. Determining a report card grade will involve teacher's professional judgments and interpretation of evidence and should reflect the students most consistent level of achievement, with special consideration given to the more recent evidence. The Principal will work with teachers to ensure common and equitable grading practices that follow Ministry policy.  A student's achievement of the overall curriculum expectations will be evaluated in accordance with the achievement chart and will be reported as percentage grades. It is expected that both mathematical calculations and professional judgements will inform the determination of the percentage mark.

5.4.1. Final Examination/Evaluation

There is value in having the culminating activity for evaluation take the form of a formal final exam. It must be consistent with course expectations from the entire course

·         Students in the same course will be similarly evaluated, which means that final exams will use the same format although particular questions may be different based on the focus of the teacher in addressing the specific expectation over the course;

·         All courses will have final examinations unless otherwise agreed to by the Principal;

·         Many courses will also have another form of final evaluation suitable to the course content e.g. project, presentation, essay etc.

·         Students are informed through the Course Outline about the final evaluation and its value in the overall mark;

·         Final exams/evaluations  will be conducted at or toward the end the course;

 

 

 

5.4.2. Assignments

·         Students assume the responsibility to ensure that they have completed all of the assigned requirements of the course before writing the final exam or assessment task.

·         Once the final exam is written or the final assessment is submitted, no further assignments may be submitted, unless prior arrangements have been made between the student and the teacher. Students will receive zeros for any unsubmitted assignments.

·         Assignments may be varied to include such assignments as essays, term papers, experiments, projects, participation in group discussions, etc.

5.4.3. Unit Tests

·         Students must complete all of the assignments and/or  tests that serve as an assessment ‘of’ learning for each of the units in the course.

6. Ontario Student Record (OSR) and Ontario Student Transcript (OST)

The Ontario Student Transcript is an official document issued by a secondary school to a student upon graduation. It is stored in the student's Ontario Student Record (OSR) and retained for 55 years after a student retires from school. It is a record of all secondary school course work and diploma requirements.

Bright Future Academy Procedure:

The OST will be issued to students requiring a transcript as well as to all students upon graduation when the OSR is held by Bright Future Academy.

If the student is currently attending another school - public or private - and is simply taking a single course from Bright Future Academy, then that student's OSR will reside at the school that the student is attending. Where students registered in a publicly funded secondary school, earn a credit or credits with Bright Future Academy, the principal of the publicly funded secondary school is responsible for ensuring that the Bright Future Academy credit is recorded on the student's OST. Bright Future Academy establishes or obtains the student OSR containing the OST, only if the student becomes the sole responsibility of Bright Future Academy.

 

 

6.1. Withdrawal from a Course

The Ontario Ministry of Education has instructed that schools in Ontario implement a policy of full disclosure in September, 1999. This policy states that all grade 11 and 12 courses attempted by students must be recorded on Ontario Student Transcripts. This means that any course completed, dropped or failed will appear on a student transcript along with the marks earned in the program. The timelines to be followed for this issuance are outlined below:

·         Withdrawals occurring within 5 days of the issuing of the first report card from Bright Future Academy will result in the mark not being recorded on the OST.

·         A withdrawal from a Grade 11 or 12 course after 5 days of the issuing of the first report card results in a "W" being entered in the "Credit" column of the OST along with the mark at the time of the withdrawal.

·         Withdrawals at anytime from Grade 9 or 10 courses are not recorded on the OST

·         If there are extraordinary circumstances relating to a student's withdrawal from a course, an "S" may be entered in the "Note" column on the OST.

6.2. Repetition of a Course

·         Only one credit is earned if course is repeated

·         In Grade 11 and 12, an "R" appears on the student's OST for the course with the lower mark

7. Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR)

Prior learning includes the knowledge and skills that students have acquired, in both formal and informal ways, outside Ontario secondary school classrooms. Through a formal evaluation and accreditation process known as Prior Learning Assessment and Recognition (PLAR), students enrolled in Ontario secondary schools, including the Independent Learning Centre and inspected private schools that choose to implement PLAR, may have their skills and knowledge evaluated against the overall expectations outlined in provincial curriculum policy documents in order to earn credits towards the secondary school diploma. PLAR procedures are carried out under the direction of the school principal, who grants the credits.

The PLAR process involves two components: challenge and equivalency. The challenge process is the process whereby students' prior learning is assessed for the purpose of granting credit for a course developed from a provincial curriculum policy document. The equivalency process involves the assessment of credentials from other jurisdictions.

PLAR for Regular Day School Students:

For regular day school students, a maximum of 4 credits may be granted through the challenge process for Grade 10, 11, and 12 courses; or for Levels 1, 2, and 3 in classical languages courses; for Levels 2, 3, and 4 in international languages courses; and for Levels 3, 4, and 5 in Native languages courses. No more than 2 of these credits may be granted in one discipline.

Regular day school students who transfer to an Ontario secondary school from a school outside Ontario or from a non-inspected private school may be granted equivalent credits through the PLAR equivalency process for regular day school students based on the principal's evaluation of their previous learning. The total number of equivalent credits and the corresponding number of compulsory credits are recorded on the OST.

Bright Future Academy Procedure:

Bright Future Academy does not offer the provision for PLAR Challenge. Presently Bright Future Academy will be not have students enrolled as full-time students and therefore will not be granting equivalent credits. At such time when BFA establishes and maintains the OSR for a student coming from out-of-province, there will be equivalent credits granted.

8. Support and Resources

8.1. Guidance and Career Programs

Bright Future Academy provides supplementary individual student counseling with respect to course selection and post secondary planning. By doing so, individual student needs and concerns are met and appropriate plans can be put into place. In addition, the skills and competencies that students acquire through the guidance and career education program will not only help students succeed in school, but will also contribute to their success in the workplace.

Throughout their secondary school education, students in Bright Future Academy courses will learn about the educational and career opportunities that are available to them; explore and evaluate a variety of those opportunities; relate what they learn in their courses to potential careers in a variety of fields; and learn to make appropriate educational and career choices.

To this end, Bright Future Academy:

  • clearly states competencies for students in each subject;
  • provides a range of career exploration activities within each course;
  • prepares an individual pathways plan for each student whose Ontario Student Record (OSR) is held by Bright Future Academy;
  • provides to students individual assistance and short-term counseling when requested;
  • provides program of study advice;
  • provides timely information on post-secondary programs to all of its students.

Students attending Bright Future Academy, when Ontario Student Records held by the Academy, will have individual pathways plans created in consultation with the student, the student's parent or guardian when the student is under 18 years of age and the Bright Future Academy Principal.